Blyth St Mary and St Martin

Glass

West window to south aisle

Angels with scrolls in the tracery and arms of Mellish and Cunard above two levels of saints under canopies, signed with the wheatsheaf lower left for C E Kempe. The window depicts the following:

Upper lights

St John the Evangelist, holding an open book in both hands, with his symbol of the eagle lower left

Angel Gabriel with hand raised in blessing, part of the Annunciation with the Virgin in the centre light, her symbol of the lily in the lower right corner

St Martin of Tours as a bishop with a supplicant beggar lower right

St Luke holding an open book in his left hand and a quill in his right, symbol of a winged bull lower right

Lower lights

St James dressed as a pilgrim with a scallop shell on his hat, a book held in his right arm and a sword in his left

Bald but bearded male saint holding a closed book in his right hand and a staff in his left, crowned ‘b’s in background, Barnabas?

Isaiah, identified by the wording on his scroll, but with crowned ‘e’s in background

Mitred abbot in black robes holding an open book to which he points, St Benedict?

St Nicholas of Bari dressed as a bishop with his crozier and a barrel with the figures of the children lower left

Inscription panel lower right. The window was restored in 1996.

The inscription reads:

To the honour of God and in
memory of Margaret Ann Mellish,
who entered into rest Dec. xith
A.D. mdcccci in her eighty second
year, this window is dedicated.

A brass plate under the window reads:

THIS WINDOW WAS RE-DEDICATED
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
MARY CARLTON COOK
AND IN GRATITUDE FOR
HER DEDICATED SERVICE
TO THIS CHURCH (JULY 2000)

South Aisle Windows

The south aisle south windows are a series of Old and New Testament typological windows in which the New Testament is demonstrated to be the fulfilment of the prophecies of the Old. The windows share the same design and format and are all the work of the same London-based studio of Burlisson and Grylls, although they are for members of different families. The colouring and style of the windows is based on English 15th-century glass. The first four also share the same design for the background at the top of the lights which consists of a square trellis in pale green against a neutral background. The western window, which is the latest of them, does not have it. Three of the windows (s1, s2 and s4 below) were paid for by Col Thomas Weldon and his wife, according to the plaque at the east end of the aisle.

Window s1

Three lights with the Agnus Dei above two angels with scrolls in the tracery. They show:

Left
  The doubting of Thomas, above the angels appearing to Abraham and Sarah disguised as strangers
Centre
  The Ascension, above Abraham meeting Melchizedek and receiving bread and wine from him
Right
  Christ meeting St Mary Magdalene in the garden, above Abel giving his best lamb as an offering

There are canopies to the upper parts of the lights with tracery to the lower, and borders of blue with white devices to all three lights. Shields with IHC and XPC in torses above the first and third lights.

By Burlisson and Grylls.

Inscription as follows:

To the Glory of God, and in loving
memory of Mary Helen Meckle Sewell,
born 23rd Feb: 1867, died 7th Nov 1889.

Window s2

Three lights with the Agnus Dei above two angels with scrolls in the tracery.

Left
  The entombment of Christ, above Moses striking the rock
Centre
  The Crucifixion, above Moses with the brazen serpent wrapped around a cross
Right
  The stripping of Christ, with the figure of the Virgin on the left, above the sacrifice of the Passover lamb

Canopies to the upper parts of the lights with tracery to the lower, and borders of red with white devices to all three lights. Shields with IHC and XPC in torses above the first and third lights.

By Burlisson and Grylls.

The inscription reads:

To the glory of God, and in loving memory of
General George Willm Young Simpson Royal Artillery, died 27th Jan:
1879); and Mary Helen his wife, died 8th June 1866.

Window s3

Three lights with the Agnus Dei above two angels with scrolls in the tracery.

Left
  Christ before Pilate, above Joseph cast into the pit
Centre
  Christ carrying the cross approached by the Virgin and St John, above Abraham with Isaac carrying the fuel for his sacrifice
Right
  The Agony in the Garden, above Adam cast out in the wilderness

Again there are canopies to the upper parts of the lights with tracery to the lower, and borders in red or blue to all three lights. Shields with IHC and XPC in torses above the first and third lights.

By Burlisson and Grylls.

The inscription reads:

To the glory of God, and in loving
memory of Lieutenant George Samuel Mellish
died 14th February 1882. aged 21.

Window s4

Three lights with an open book and two angels with scrolls in the tracery.

Left
  Christ heals the blind man, above the king of Israel looking at the sky to see the clouds that will give him victory over his enemies from 2 Kings 7.5
Centre
  Lazarus raised from the dead, above Ezekiel raising the dead from the valley of the bones
Right
  Christ heals the leper, above Naaman the leper is healed in the River Jordan

Each of the three lights has the upper scene set under an architectural canopy, with the lower scenes under fictive tracery, and all three lights have decorative borders in red or blue. The initials for Alpha and Omega in Greek are set in torses at the head of the left and right lights.

Inscription as follows:

To the glory of God & in loving memory of
Ellen, widow of Henry Frederick Walker of Blyth Hall
Died at Blyth 30th January 1889

Window s5

Three lights with figure of God and two angels with scrolls in the tracery.

Left
  The baptism of Christ, above David anointed by Samuel
Centre
  The presentation of Christ in the Temple, above Hannah presenting Samuel to Eli
Right
  Adoration of the Infant Christ by the Virgin and Joseph, above the discovery of Moses in the bulrushes

All three lights have decorative borders in red or blue and the lower scenes of all three lights have fictive tracery while only the centre light has an architectural canopy.

The inscription reads:

In loving memory of Charles Gray M. A.
vicar of Blyth mdccclxxv - xcvi who restored
this Church to something of its
ancient beauty and enriched the Parish
with the district Churches of Ranskill and
Barnby Moor. Laus Deo R. I. P.

North aisle windows

Window n1

Two angels holding scrolls against a blue ground, arranged in two pointed ovals. Includes some fragments of medieval glass.

Window n4

19th-century head of Christ with patterned cross nimbus, above inscription in Latin recording its donation by Maria Amelia Rudd in 1935 (John Rudd was vicar from 1813-34) in memory of John Rudd, vicar of Blyth, his wife Elizabeth and William Thomas, their second son.

The inscription reads as follows:

Ne nomen depereat Johannis Rudd quondam
Vicarii de Blyth, Elizabethae uxoris et
Guillelmi Thomae Rudd filii secundi hanc posuit
fenestram Maria Amelia Rudd A.D. MCMXXXV R.I.P.

(Lest the name of John Rudd, once vicar of Blyth be forgotten. Elizabeth, his wife and William Thomas Rudd, his second son, this window was placed here by Maria Amelia Rudd in AD 1935 Rest in Peace)

Window n5

Christ appearing to three kneeling figures, a child between two adults who holds a scroll with, DOMINE, TU ES IN COELO, (Master, who are in Heaven, from the Lord’s Prayer), in a roundel, with edge inscription, SINITE PARVVLOS VENIRE AD ME (let the children come to me, from Mark 10.14) between two other roundels divided in half and presented reversed, top, Annunciation, lower two musical angels, with initials FER on quatrefoils. Borders with flowers. Based on early medieval format, probably mid 19th-century. No dedicatory inscription, but presumably for a child, perhaps Francisca Elizabeth Raine, who died in 1850, aged 5 years, whose grave slab is in the north aisle.

Window n6

Two quatrefoil panels, Peter raising Dorcas above Ezekiel in his chariot being taken to Heaven by an angel. Inscription in base of window:

In ...riam defvnct.m

Based on early medieval format, probably early to mid 19th-century.